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Unexpected Food and Wine Pairings for Your Spring Feasts

Saturday, April 21, 2018 / No Comments


(StatePoint) Spring is here, which means it is time to create sensational seasonal wine and food pairings to elegantly entertain family and friends.

Experts suggest Cabernet Sauvignon as a selection well suited for the transition to warmer temperatures, as the bold, bright red and black fruit flavors with hints of spice pair easily with both hearty and lighter fare.

“Cabernet Sauvignon is more versatile than most believe. It can be enjoyed with different cheeses, meats, vegetables and even certain types of fish,” says Molly Hill, Winemaker at Sequoia Grove Winery.

For a classic expression, consider Sequoia Grove Winery’s Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. This tempting red wine maximizes the distinct flavor characteristics of its origin, the Rutherford Bench, one of Napa Valley’s most revered growing regions for Cabernet.

At your next spring dinner, try serving the Sequoia Grove 2015 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon (SRP: $44.99), a full-bodied wine featuring notes of sweet vanilla and spice, followed by blackberry, strawberry, and berry pie aromas.

For a timeless pairing, try this recipe for Roasted Leg of Lamb. This dish balances well-seasoned lamb with the acid in citrus to create a delicious pairing for this elegant Cabernet Sauvignon.

Ingredients:

(Serves 10-12)

• 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves

• 2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary leaves

• 3 garlic cloves, minced

• 1 small onion, chopped

• 1/4 cup olive oil

• 1/4 cup red wine vinegar

• 2 tablespoons orange juice

• 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard

• 1 (4 to 5 pound) boneless leg of lamb, butterflied

• 1 teaspoon salt

• Squeeze of lemon

• Freshly ground black pepper

Method:

Evening Before:

• In a food storage bag, combine thyme, rosemary, garlic, onion, oil, vinegar, orange juice and mustard. Mix well.

• Add the leg of lamb; seal the bag and turn to coat. Massage the meat through the bag for a few minutes to help the marinade set in. Put the storage bag into a large roasting pan to marinate for 24 hours in the refrigerator.

Day Of:

• Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

• Remove the lamb from the marinade and place in shallow roasting pan. Season with the salt, pepper, and squeeze of lemon.

• Roast, uncovered, basting with the remaining marinade several times while roasting, using all the marinade

• Roast for 50 to 70 minutes or until an instant-read meat thermometer registers 140 degrees F for medium-rare, or 150 degrees F for medium. For food safety, cook to a minimum of 140 degrees F.

• Remove from oven, cover with foil and let stand for 15 minutes before serving.

• Carve into slices against the grain. Serve with the sauce that forms in the bottom of the pan and a side of mixed root vegetables. Pair with a glass of Sequoia Grove Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon for a delightful meal experience.

PHOTO SOURCE: (c) olalalala/stock.Adobe.com
PHOTO CAPTION:




Suspect Apprehended After Alleged Theft of Golf Clubs, Held on $500,000 Bail

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A man who was wanted by the Folsom Police Department has been taken into custody after evidence left at the crime scene led to his arrest.

The suspect, Anatoliy Romanovch, 29, allegedly stole a set of expense golf clubs from a Folsom residence in late December 2017. Based on evidence left at the scene, detectives were able to tie Romanovick to the crime. 

On the afternoon of Friday,  April 20, FPD arrested Anatoliy Romanovich in North Highlands on a $500,000 felony warrant for grand theft. Arraignment will be on Tuesday, April 24 

“Getting away with the stolen property isn’t the same as not getting caught." Detective Sergeant Brian Lockhart said. "Today was an example of how we pursue criminals in Folsom.”




Man Convicted of Committing Sex, Lewd Acts on Two 7-Year Old Family Members

Monday, April 16, 2018 / No Comments




In a verdict delivered this morning, a Sacramento man was convicted on six counts of committing sex acts with a child under 10 year of age and six acts of committing lewd acts with a child.

In 2016 Chandler Ashford-Deshazo was found to have begun sexually assaulting two female family members, who were both 7-years old at the time. Neither of the victims told their parents or each other about the abuse. 

On April 7, 2017, a family member caught Ashford-Deshazo during one of the sexual assaults. Ashford-Deshazo fled the house and was later arrested that night for being drunk in public. 

He was released on that charge the next day and immediately fled to San Diego, where he was apprehended two months later. Ashford-Deshazo faces a maximum sentence of 90-years to life in prison.

 Sentencing is set for May 11, 2018 in Department 36 before Judge Stephen Acquisto.



Caught on Camera, Sac Sheriff's Seeks to Identify Light Rail Armed Robbers

Sunday, April 15, 2018 / No Comments
The Sacramento Sheriff's Department is seeking the public's assistance locating two suspected armed robbers.

On March 16, 2018, at approximately 3:30 p.m. the two suspects in the photos (see below) approached a male at the light rail station near Folsom Boulevard & Olson Drive within the City of Rancho Cordova.  One of the suspects (Suspect 1), depicted in the photos as wearing a red sweatshirt with a “Jordan” logo brandished a handgun at the victim and demanded his money.
The second suspect (Suspect 2) pictured wearing a maroon Aeropostale sweatshirt and Suspect-1 fled from the area on foot after taking the victims money.
Detectives are asking anyone with information relating to this incident, to please contact the Sheriff’s Department at (916) 874-5115 or Sacramento Valley Crime Stoppers at (916) 443-HELP.  Tip information may also be left anonymously at www.sacsheriff.com or by calling (916) 874-TIPS (8477).


Suspect 1


Suspect 2.

Fed's Raid of Pot Houses in Region Represents The Best of News, The Worst of News For Elk Grove

Monday, April 9, 2018 / No Comments
McGregor Scott (left) and Sean Ragan announce the raid and seizure of
pot houses in the Sacramento region. |

As widely reported this week, a task force of Federal, state and local law enforcement agencies participated in what was characterized as a significant takedown of residential marijuana growing operations in the Sacramento region. Many of the 75-plus houses raided where not surprisingly in Elk Grove.

According to information released by U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of California McGregor Scott and Special Agent in Charge Sean Ragan for the FBI's Sacramento office, the four-year investigation led to the discovery that many of these operations were funded by money coming from the Peoples Republic of China. As a result, several individuals were arrested, and of greater significance, civil forfeitures of up to 100 dwellings were initiated.

For residents of Elk Grove, this is a welcome development. At times it seems this site reports almost on a weekly basis Elk Grove Police serving search warrants on suspected marijuana growing operations.

While it is now legal to grow up to six plants per residence and possess and consume marijuana for personal use, these grow houses operate outside the scope of California and federal law. As such they are at a minimum, nuisances to the neighborhood who often see the desirability, safety, and value of their houses collectively diminished.

The role Elk Grove Police, along with the other agencies have taken in addressing this problem is certainly good news in Elk Grove. If you have any doubt, just ask neighbors who have been subjected to a grow house on their street.

This enhanced enforcement in light of marijuana's legalization in California is welcome news, it raises some questions worth contemplating. More specifically it raises many questions about Elk Grove's future and its leaders.

Residents are undoubtedly happy that the EGPD is aggressively pursuing these illegal operations, they are not without costs. Not only does this proliferation of illegal activities right under our collectives noses diminish our community's reputation, the fiscal cost to taxpayers is not insignificant.  

As noted in our report, the raids took place across the region with Sacramento and Elk Grove, with 41 and 16 operations busted respectively. Although there were several smaller communities listed such as Galt, Herald, Rio Linda and Wilton included, there were several nearby cities conspicuously missing from the list.

There was no mention of Citrus Heights, Rancho Cordova, West Sacramento, Folsom, and Roseville.

Does this mean these communities have no grow houses? Probably not, as we see there were two in the Placer County municipality of Lincoln.

And therein lies the dilemma for Elk Grove leaders - why have there been so many grow houses in the city, and what steps can they take to vanquish this scourge. 

Part of the answer is as the second largest city in the region it is invariable that when compared to Sacramento, there was about half as many in Elk Grove as there. According to the information posted by Sacramento Bee reporter Stan Stanton on Twitter, of the 75 houses raided last week 41 were in Sacramento and 16 in Elk Grove, which is roughly the same ratio when comparing each city's population.


Still, this does not answer why a community like Roseville with about 135,000 people had no dwellings in the raid. Given the ratios between Sacramento and Elk Grove, by comparison, Roseville should have had about 12 houses.

There could be any number of reasons why there were no raids in Roseville. Likewise, there are probably many reasons why Elk Grove continues to be a haven for multi-national pot operations, but as it stands the public only knows that as police vigilantly raid houses on their street another one pops-up around the corner like a game of whack a mole.

Elk Grove famously overbuilt rooftops in the lead up the 2008 credit collapse and the ensuing Great Recession and became one of the epicenters of the foreclosure crisis. This abundance of cheap, new houses undoubtedly led to many of the so-called hard cash purchases of dwellings that went on to become today's pot grow houses. 

As for the leadership in Elk Grove, it is time the four men and one woman on the city council take a  long, hard look at the reasons neighborhoods throughout the city are being subjected to this menace. If leadership fails yet again and continues down the path of unbridled growth without addressing the reasons residents are subjected to this, we can only expect more of the same, particularly when it comes to having our neighborhoods infested by illegal growing operations or worse.

Let's see if they mean business when they talk about building stronger neighborhoods and address this menace on our community or if they are just blowing smoke.  






Unexpected Food and Wine Pairings for Your Spring Feasts

/ No Comments


(StatePoint) Spring is here, which means it is time to create sensational seasonal wine and food pairings to elegantly entertain family and friends.

Experts suggest Cabernet Sauvignon as a selection well suited for the transition to warmer temperatures, as the bold, bright red and black fruit flavors with hints of spice pair easily with both hearty and lighter fare.

“Cabernet Sauvignon is more versatile than most believe. It can be enjoyed with different cheeses, meats, vegetables and even certain types of fish,” says Molly Hill, Winemaker at Sequoia Grove Winery.

For a classic expression, consider Sequoia Grove Winery’s Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. This tempting red wine maximizes the distinct flavor characteristics of its origin, the Rutherford Bench, one of Napa Valley’s most revered growing regions for Cabernet.

At your next spring dinner, try serving the Sequoia Grove 2015 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon (SRP: $44.99), a full-bodied wine featuring notes of sweet vanilla and spice, followed by blackberry, strawberry, and berry pie aromas.

For a timeless pairing, try this recipe for Roasted Leg of Lamb. This dish balances well-seasoned lamb with the acid in citrus to create a delicious pairing for this elegant Cabernet Sauvignon.

Ingredients:

(Serves 10-12)

• 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves

• 2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary leaves

• 3 garlic cloves, minced

• 1 small onion, chopped

• 1/4 cup olive oil

• 1/4 cup red wine vinegar

• 2 tablespoons orange juice

• 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard

• 1 (4 to 5 pound) boneless leg of lamb, butterflied

• 1 teaspoon salt

• Squeeze of lemon

• Freshly ground black pepper

Method:

Evening Before:

• In a food storage bag, combine thyme, rosemary, garlic, onion, oil, vinegar, orange juice and mustard. Mix well.

• Add the leg of lamb; seal the bag and turn to coat. Massage the meat through the bag for a few minutes to help the marinade set in. Put the storage bag into a large roasting pan to marinate for 24 hours in the refrigerator.

Day Of:

• Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

• Remove the lamb from the marinade and place in shallow roasting pan. Season with the salt, pepper, and squeeze of lemon.

• Roast, uncovered, basting with the remaining marinade several times while roasting, using all the marinade

• Roast for 50 to 70 minutes or until an instant-read meat thermometer registers 140 degrees F for medium-rare, or 150 degrees F for medium. For food safety, cook to a minimum of 140 degrees F.

• Remove from oven, cover with foil and let stand for 15 minutes before serving.

• Carve into slices against the grain. Serve with the sauce that forms in the bottom of the pan and a side of mixed root vegetables. Pair with a glass of Sequoia Grove Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon for a delightful meal experience.

PHOTO SOURCE: (c) olalalala/stock.Adobe.com
PHOTO CAPTION:


Metropolitan Water District Reverses Course on Delta Tunnels Again

Sunday, April 8, 2018 / No Comments


By Dan Bacher |  

The Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of Southern California, one of the key backers of Governor Jerry Brown’s Delta Tunnels project, on Friday, April 6, changed its position again on whether to finance a two tunnels project or a staged project, with one tunnel to be built first and a second tunnel to be constructed later.

On Monday, MWD general manager Jeff Kightlinger reported in a memo to the board that staff would submit at the board meeting on Tuesday, April 10, a recommendation for the powerful water district to fund its share of a potential first stage of the California WaterFix. This would include two intakes and a single tunnel with a capacity of 6,000 cfs.

However, things have changed since Monday. “Since then, a number of Metropolitan directors have requested that the option presented at the February 27 board workshop for Metropolitan to finance California WaterFix at a level that would allow the full project to move forward also be brought to the Board for consideration,” said Kightlinger in today’s memo to Board Members.

“Accordingly, the board letter that has been posted sets forth both options, with a staff recommendation to express Metropolitan’s support if the Department of Water Resources elects to pursue a staged approach and support of Metropolitan’s participation at up to 47.1% of the project cost,” he stated.


After hearing of MWD’s change in plans to put the two project options up for a vote, Brenna Norton, Senior Organizer for Food & Water Watch, responded,  “Whether one tunnel or two, Southern California residents will foot most of the bill for the tunnels.”

“Rather than investing in faraway projects, we should invest in local projects that put LA back to work and guarantee new water for our communities,” Norton concluded.

On Tuesday, April 10, Food and Water Watch, Sierra Club California, the Southern CA Watershed Alliance, and S.E.E. are organizing a press conference and rally to protest MWD’s board vote to fund the California WaterFix. 

The press conference starts at 11 AM, with the MWD board vote and public comments beginning at 12 PM. It will take place at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California Headquarters, 700 Alameda St, Los Angeles, CA 90012 (next to Union Station).

“After eleven years, and over a quarter of a billion dollars, the project description, operational details, and cost analysis are still sorely lacking,” said Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla, Executive Director of Restore the Delta (RTD). “This isn't simply about the people of the Delta being opposed to the plan. It's about the State, and its sponsor MWD, failing to make an honest and accurate case for any tunnels that show.” 

Those who cannot attend but wish to watch the press conference can watch live at 11AM on the Food and Water Watch Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoodWaterWatchCalifornia/

Those wishing to watch the MWD board vote online are encouraged to tune in to MWD’s livestream at 12PM:  http://www.mwdh2o.com/WhoWeAre/Board/Board-Meeting   

For more information, read my earlier article about Metropolitan Water District’s recommendation to finance only a staged California WaterFix project: https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/4/5/1754635/-Metropolitan-Water-District-Withdraws-Support-for-Full-Funding-of-Delta-Tunnels-Project

The State Water Resources Control Board is currently conducting evidentiary hearings on the petition by the California Department of Water Resources and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to change the point of diversions for the Delta Tunnels project, in spite of a change in the project by the state and federal governments from the twin tunnels to a two-phase project. The board has to date rejected the pile of recent motions by cities, counties, water agencies, conservation groups, fishing groups and farming organizations to stay the hearing. 

The Delta Tunnels project would hasten the extinction of Central Valley steelhead, Sacramento River winter and spring Chinook salmon, Delta and longfin smelt, green sturgeon and other fish species. It would also imperil the salmon and steelhead populations on the Trinity and Klamath rivers, according to opponents.

Photo courtesy of Food & Water Watch.